preeclampsia

Focus on health risks for new mothers for Preeclampsia Awareness Month

May is Preeclampsia Awareness Month and NCMA Women’s OB/GYN Center joins with the Preeclampsia Foundation to help raise awareness. This year the foundation’s efforts are on postpartum preeclampsia as 97 percent of maternal deaths related to preeclampsia and other hypertensive disorders of pregnancy occur within just six weeks of delivery, a time when most new mothers might think the danger has passed.

A woman can develop preeclampsia after her baby is born, regardless of whether she experienced high blood pressure during her pregnancy. With such alarming statistics related to postpartum preeclampsia, it very important that a new mother remain vigilant and continue to monitor her heart health and blood pressure even after delivery.

Understanding preeclampsia

Postpartum preeclampsia is a serious condition related to high blood pressure. Women who have just delivered a baby are most at risk, although it has no effect on the baby. There is no known cause for preeclampsia to manifest in pregnant women. In many cases, women diagnosed with preeclampsia see symptoms abate following delivery, but the Preeclampsia Foundation emphasizes that ‘delivery is not a cure’. In some cases, symptoms begin during pregnancy, but some patients may not be symptomatic until after the baby is born. Postpartum preeclampsia most commonly occurs within the first seven days after delivery although new mothers remain at risk for up to six weeks following delivery.

Know the warning signs

Early diagnosis and being vigilant to symptoms followed by quick response is imperative to saving lives. Symptoms include (and can be complicated by lack of sleep, postpartum depression and/or simple lack of awareness about the signs):

  • nausea
  • swelling in hands/feet
  • severe headache
  • seeing spots or other vision changes
  • shortness of breath

When a patient thinks they are experiencing warning signs of postpartum preeclampsia, the first thing to do is go to the Emergency Department, request to be seen by an OB, and report that they have recently given birth. The first seven days after delivery is when women who experience preeclampsia are at highest risk. Effectively controlling high blood pressure is key to avoiding very serious health risks that include; seizures, stroke, organ damage and sometimes death.

About NCMA Women’s OBGYN Center

Our provider team of expert OB/GYN physicians, certified nurse midwives, family nurse practitioners, and medical assistants provides unmatched care to patients in our region. As women proudly serving women, we understand the needs and expectations of our patients. For more information, visit our website or call 707-579-1102.

Researchers find Vitamin B3 beneficial for pregnant women to treat preeclampsia, prevent strokes

Vitamin B3 nicotinamide may help treat pregnant women who suffer from preeclampsia by preventing strokes and in some cases, even stimulating the growth of their fetus, research indicates.

Scientists in Japan and the US have found that vitamin B3 nicotinamide may help treat pregnant women who suffer from preeclampsia by preventing strokes and in some cases, even stimulating the growth of their fetus.

Up to 8% of pregnant women suffer from preeclampsia, a deadly disease characterized by high blood pressure, blood vessel damage, high levels of protein in the urine and fluid retention that causes swelling in the legs and feet. In some cases, preeclampsia is also believed to restrict a fetus’ growth.

Blood pressure-lowering drugs do not improve blood vessel damage. In fact, they reduce blood supply to the babies, which could lead to fetal death.

Until now, the only treatment for preeclampsia-affected pregnant women has been delivery of the baby. Now, researchers at Tohoku University, in collaboration with US scientists, have found that nicotinamide — also referred to as Vitamin B3 — relieves preeclampsia in mouse models. Moreover, they have also discovered that nicotinamide can even improve fetal growth in mothers with preeclampsia.

“We had previously shown that endothelin, a strong vessel narrowing hormone, worsens preeclampsia. But inhibiting the hormone is harmful to the babies,” says Associate Professor Nobuyuki Takahashi of Tohoku University’s Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, who co-led the study.

“In contrast, nicotinamide is generally safe to mothers and babies, corrects the blood vessel narrowing effect of endothelin, and reduces stress to the babies. Accordingly, we evaluated the effects of nicotinamide using two mouse models of preeclampsia caused by different mechanisms.”

The researchers concluded that nicotinamide is the first safe drug that lowers blood pressure, reduces urine protein and alleviates blood vessel damage in preeclampsia-affected mice. The researchers went on to show that in many cases, nicotinamide also prevents miscarriage, prolongs pregnancy period and improves the growth of the babies in mice with preeclampsia.

“Nicotinamide merits evaluation for preventing and treating preeclampsia in humans,” says Oliver Smithies, a Weatherspoon Eminent Distinguished Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Smithies is a Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine, and co-leader of this study.

The research team hopes that if the treatment works in humans, nicotinamide could help treat preeclampsia and prevent fetal growth restriction associated with the disease in pregnant women.

Journal Reference:

  1. Feng Li, Tomofumi Fushima, Gen Oyanagi, H. W. Davin Townley-Tilson, Emiko Sato, Hironobu Nakada, Yuji Oe, John R. Hagaman, Jennifer Wilder, Manyu Li, Akiyo Sekimoto, Daisuke Saigusa, Hiroshi Sato, Sadayoshi Ito, J. Charles Jennette, Nobuyo Maeda, S. Ananth Karumanchi, Oliver Smithies, Nobuyuki Takahashi. Nicotinamide benefits both mothers and pups in two contrasting mouse models of preeclampsia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2016; 113 (47): 13450 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1614947113

Read this article on Science daily:  “Potential treatment for pregnant women who suffer from preeclampsia found in a vitamin.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 December 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/12/161219100556.htm>.