hormone therapy

When it comes to hormone therapy, you have options

Menopause care may include hormone therapy treatment

Your body’s hormone levels go through significant changes during the menopause transition, and resulting hormonal imbalances can create uncomfortable physical symptoms and mood swings. Fortunately, hormone therapy (HT) enables menopausal women to substitute for the hormones that are reduced during this transition to relieve symptoms and achieve long-term health advantages. Our physicians will talk with you about the risks and benefits of hormone therapy to help you find the options that best fit your individual body and lifestyle.

In recent years, the media has spotlighted menopause and HT helping to increase general awareness, but it is still important to filter the available information in the context of scientific-based research and peer-reviewed evidence from medical professionals.

Quick facts:

  • The term “hormone therapy” covers both traditional hormone therapy (HRT) and natural (bioidentical) hormone replacement therapy (BHRT), as well as estrogen and combined estrogen/progesterone treatment.
  • BHRT makes use of hormones that are identical to human hormones, and HRT makes use of synthetic hormones that have a slight physical variation to bioidentical hormones, but serve the similar purpose of replacing hormones lost during menopause.
  • Nearly all modern hormone medications are derived from the same plant sources.

Your physician at NCMA Women’s OB/GYN Center will personalize your HT treatment after accounting for various health benefits and risks based on your symptoms and lifestyle. Not all women will be candidates for HT, and medications and other health factors can affect eligibility.

Learn more about hormone therapy from National Institutes of Health.

Discontinuance of Hormone Therapy May Be Hazardous to the Heart

A new study demonstrates that the risk of cardiac and stroke death actually increases in the first year after discontinuation of HT.
Hormone therapy (HT) continues to be a hotly debated topic. The benefits of estrogen to the heart, however, appear to be universally accepted. A new study demonstrates that the risk of cardiac and stroke death actually increases in the first year after discontinuation of HT. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

Since publication of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial data, there has been significant disagreement over the various risks and benefits of HT. What remains relatively unchallenged is the fact that estrogen has rapid beneficial vascular effects and that shorter periods between the onset of menopause and the initiation of HT provide greater protection against cardiovascular disease. This beneficial relationship between HT and protection against heart disease has led to the speculation that withdrawal from HT could result in clinically significant changes in arterial function. Although previous studies have shown that termination of estradiol-based HT led to significant increases in the risk of cardiac and stroke deaths, particularly during the first year, these results were questioned because women with documented heart problems had not been excluded from the study.

This study, however, involving more than 400,000 Finnish women excluded women with prior cardiac or stroke events. The results of the study, published in the article “Increased cardiac and stroke death risk in the first year after discontinuation of postmenopausal hormone therapy,” showed that discontinuation of HT was associated with an increased risk of cardiac and stroke death during the first posttreatment year, especially in women who discontinued HT aged younger than 60 years. This increased risk was not observed in women aged 60 years or older at the time of discontinuation.

“Since the initial Women’s Health Initiative reports, studies have shown that hormone therapy has many benefits and is safer than originally thought. This is especially true for symptomatic menopausal women younger than age 60 and within 10 years of menopause, as these women had fewer heart events and less risk of mortality,” says Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton, NAMS executive director. “This new study suggests that younger women may have a higher risk of heart disease and stroke during the first year of discontinuation. Thus, women and their healthcare providers need to consider the benefits and risks of starting and stopping hormone therapy before making any decisions.”


Story Source:

Materials provided by The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Read this article on ScienceDaily.com: The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). “Risk of cardiac and stroke death increases after discontinuing hormone therapy: Highest risk occurs in first year after discontinuation, especially in women aged younger than 60 years.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 November 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171108124156.htm.