OB/GYN News Articles

The facts about licorice extracts for treating menopausal symptoms

Licorice roots have a flavorful history, having been used in ancient Egyptian teas and in traditional Chinese medicines, all the way to today as a flavoring agent and candy. And some women now take licorice extracts as supplements to treat menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that licorice could pose a health risk by interacting with medications.
Women take licorice extracts as supplements to treat menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that licorice could pose a health risk by interacting with medications.Licorice roots have a diverse and flavorful history, having been used in ancient Egyptian times as a tea and in traditional Chinese medicines, all the way to today as a flavoring agent and as an ingredient in some licorice candies. Some women now take licorice extracts as supplements to treat hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that the substance could pose a health risk by interacting with medications.

The researchers are presenting their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

“Concerns about the risk of stroke and breast cancer associated with conventional hormone therapy are prompting women to seek alternatives,” Richard B. van Breemen, Ph.D., says. “Some take botanical dietary supplements, such as licorice, to treat menopausal symptoms like hot flashes.”

But just because a substance is sold as a supplement in a health food store doesn’t mean it is completely safe for all people to take. And on its own, even as a candy, licorice can be harmful in some cases. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that licorice not be eaten in large amounts during one sitting, and warns that excessive consumption can lead to irregular heart rhythm and muscle fatigue.

“Consuming too much licorice can be harmful, but in our lab, we wondered whether the small amounts in dietary supplements might also cause problems by interfering with drug metabolism or transportation,” says van Breemen, who is at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “The liver has enzymes that process medications, and if these enzymes are induced or inhibited, the drugs will either be processed too quickly or too slowly, respectively.” He points out that these changes could pose a significant safety risk to those who take a daily licorice dietary supplement along with other medication.

Van Breemen’s team analyzed how three types of licorice — two North American species, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and G. inflata, and a European species called G. glabra — affected liver enzymes involved in drug metabolism. They found that all three species inhibit several of these enzymes. Only G. uralensis and G. inflataextracts were found to induce some of these enzymes. Therefore, the researchers say that G. uralensis and G. inflata are more likely to interfere with drug metabolism when compared to G. glabra.

Consumers would have a difficult time using this information, however, because most supplements don’t list the species on their labels. But the researchers are using this knowledge to develop their own licorice therapy that would be safe and effective for women experiencing menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes. They plan to start clinical trials on their G. glabra-based supplements next year.


Story Source:

Materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Read this article on Science Daily: American Chemical Society. “Licorice is a hot trend in hot flashes, but could interact with medications.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170821085705.htm.

Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group Physicians Recognized as Among “Top Doctors” of 2017 by Sonoma County Magazine

Santa Rosa physicians, Lela Emad, Shazah Khawaja, and Susan Logan of NCMA Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group have been chosen as among the top Obstetrics and Gynecology doctors by Sonoma Magazine’s Top Doctors survey.

Santa Rosa physicians, Lela Emad, Shazah Khawaja, and Susan Logan Top Doctors 2017

Amita Kachru, MD, Susan Logan MD, Lela Emad MD, Shazah Khawaja, MD

Sonoma Magazine’s Top Doctor 2017 survey polled Sonoma County doctors and medical specialists for healthcare practitioners they most often recommend to a loved one. More than 300 professionals are noted in the September issue as “the crème de la crème” in more than 50 categories. Among physician peers Dr. Lela Emad, Dr. Shazah Khawaja and Dr. Susan Logan ranked at the top for most likely to be referred in the category of OB/GYN specialists. “For the second year in a row, we are honored to be included among such an elite group of physicians in Sonoma County,” said Dr. Emad. “Our group is devoted to the work we do for women in this community, and it is nice to be recognized by our peers.”

About the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group

With a team made up of compassionate, expert doctors, midwives, nurses and medical assistants aimed at providing unmatched care to patients, the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group offers a full range of obstetrics and gynecology services to women in the North Bay region. “By putting our patients first, our goal has always been to meet the healthcare needs of women in a comfortable environment, close to home,” says Dr. Emad. “This is something we’ve been doing for more than 25 years.”

Services offered include:

  • general gynecological health screenings
  • state-of-the-art diagnostics
  • comprehensive pregnancy and postpartum care
  • full mid-wifery services
  • minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery
  • uro-gynecological procedures
  • incontinence care
  • menopause care
  • laser hair reduction, skin care and Botox Cosmetic

Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group’s staff of physicians include; Lela Emad, MD, Shazah Khawaja, MD, Amita Kachru, MD, and Susan Logan, MD along with two new providers; Tara Bartlett, D.O and Melissa A. Seeker, M.D. Together, these doctors share a unique whole-body approach to medicine as they strive to find the underlying causes of a woman’s health problems, rather than simply treating the symptoms. The team of health professionals including Certified Nurse-Midwifes and Nurse Practitioners is committed to both alleviating short-term ailments and maximizing long-term health. The practice partnered with Northern California Medical Associates (NCMA) in 2014 to strengthen its network of experienced healthcare providers, directly benefitting patient access to healthcare specialists in the area.

“The theme of our care is ‘women proudly serving women’,” explains Dr. Emad. “As women we understand the needs and expectations of our patients, and we strive to provide each patient with the best experience possible.”

The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group works to better the lives of all women with a holistic approach to women’s health. To learn more about these fine physicians and the many services provided by the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group visit the website. Call for an appointment at (707) 579-1102.

Annual mammograms at 40 prevents the most cancer deaths

 
When to initiate screening for breast cancer, how often to screen, and how long to screen are questions that continue to spark emotional debates.

 

When to initiate screening for breast cancer, how often to screen, and how long to screen are questions that continue to spark emotional debates.When to initiate screening for breast cancer, how often to screen, and how long to screen are questions that continue to spark emotional debates. A new study compares the number of deaths that might be prevented as a result of three of the most widely discussed recommendations for screening mammography. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may provide valuable guidance to women and their physicians about choosing a screening regimen.

To uncover insights that might help women make informed choices about mammography screening, researchers led by Elizabeth Kagan Arleo, MD, of Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, and R. Edward Hendrick, PhD, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, used computer modeling to estimate the possible effects of three schemes: annual screening starting at age 40 years, annual screening at ages 45 to 54 years and then biennial screening at ages 55 to 79 years, and biennial screening at ages 50 to 74 years.

The investigators estimated how many breast cancer deaths might be prevented with the different screening schemes. The team found that the recommendation of annual screening starting at age 40 would result in the greatest reduction in breast cancer-specific deaths: a nearly 40 percent reduction in deaths due to breast cancer, compared with 23 percent to 31 percent reductions with other recommendations.

“Our findings are important and novel because this is the first time the three most widely discussed recommendations for screening mammography have been compared head to head,” said Dr. Arleo. “Our research would be put to good use if, because of our findings, women chose to start annual screening mammography starting at age 40. Over the long term, this would be significant because fewer women would die from breast cancer.”

The researchers’ modeling also considered risks associated with screening, including callbacks for additional imaging and, in some cases, a needle biopsy, both of which may reveal the absence of breast cancer despite a suspicious mammography finding.

“Our results show the differences in the three current recommendations for screening mammography in terms of benefits and risks. Women and their physicians can use these findings to guide choices of when a woman begins screening mammography and how often she gets screened,” said Dr. Hendrick.

An estimated 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 63,410 new cases of non-invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the United States in 2017, with 40,610 US women expected to die from breast cancer in 2017. About 33 million screening mammography exams are performed each year.

In an accompanying editorial, Otis Brawley, MD, of the American Cancer Society, noted that it is ultimately an individual’s value judgment as to how many false positive mammograms and biopsies are too many to save one life. He stressed that it is important to acknowledge the limitations of mammography and to make it a priority to develop a better test. “The ideal test would be easy to administer and accurate in women of all ages, meaning there would be few false positives and few tumors would be missed,” he wrote.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Wiley. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Elizabeth Kagan Arleo, R. Edward Hendrick, Mark A. Helvie, Edward A. Sickles. Comparison of recommendations for screening mammography using CISNET models. Cancer, 2017; DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30842

View this article on ScienceDaily.com; “Comparison of screening recommendations indicates annual mammography: Starting at age 40 prevents the most cancer deaths.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 2017.

 

Dr. Tara Bartlett D.O. joins The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group

Dr. Tara Bartlett, DO joins the Women’s OB/GYN Medical GroupDr. Tara C. Bartlett, DO joins the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group to become the newest member of a team of healthcare professionals made up of compassionate, expert doctors, midwives, nurses and medical assistants, all aimed at providing unmatched care to patients. Dr. Tara C. Bartlett, D.O., is a practicing obstetrician and gynecologist.  She graduated from University of California, Los Angeles as a Phi Beta Kappa with High Honors.  She holds a B.S. degree in Biology with a minor in Global Studies.  Dr. Bartlett obtained her medical degree at Western University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine in California.  She completed her residency at Genesys Regional Medical Center in Grand Blanc, Michigan.

Dr. Bartlett holds numerous awards and certifications including Da Vinci robotic surgery certification.  She is trained in minimally invasive robotic and laparoscopic surgery, hysteroscopic surgery, myosure device, novasure endometrial ablation, nexplanon insertion, and intrauterine device placement.  She has participated in a number of research projects pertaining to her specialty including HPV genotyping research.

Dr.  Bartlett has a special interest in international medicine and was awarded the Rafi Younoszai International/Cross-Cultural Health Scholarship Award in 2013.  She has participated in medical outreach providing OB/GYN services for areas with minimal healthcare access in Peru, the Dominican Republic, and northern Spain.  “We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Bartlett as the newest physician to join our unique group of women healthcare providers,” says Dr. Lela Emad of the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group. “We are honored to have her in our practice. With this addition, both staff and patients gain a very talented and caring physician focused on providing quality support and unmatched healthcare to patients.”

About the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group

With a team made up of compassionate, expert doctors, midwives, nurses and medical assistants aimed at providing unmatched care to patients, the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group offers a full range of obstetrics and gynecology services to women in the North Bay region.  Services offered include;

  • General gynecological health screenings
  • State-of-the-art diagnostics
  • Comprehensive pregnancy and postpartum care
  • Full midwifery services
  • Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery
  • Uro-gynecological procedures
  • Incontinence care
  • Menopause care
  • Laser hair reduction, skin care and Botox Cosmetic

Along with Dr. Bartlett, the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group’s staff of physicians includes; Lela Emad, MD, Shazah Khawaja, MD, Amita Kachru, MD, and Susan Logan, MD. Together, these doctors share a unique whole-body approach to medicine as they strive to find the underlying causes of a woman’s health problems, rather than simply treating the symptoms. Every one of the health professionals at Women’s OB/GYN is committed to both alleviating short-term ailments and maximizing long-term health.

The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group strives to better the lives of all women with a holistic approach to women’s health. To learn more about these fine physicians and the many services provided by the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group visit the website. Call for an appointment at (707) 579-1102.

New Study Concludes: Women have more active brains than men

Largest functional brain imaging study to date identifies specific brain differences between women and men, according to a new report in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

 In the largest functional brain imaging study to date, researchers compared 46,034 brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging studies provided by nine clinics, quantifying differences between the brains of men and women.

The study findings explain why women tend to exhibit greater strengths in the areas of empathy, intuition, collaboration, self-control, and concern.
Side view of the brain summarizing blood flow results from tens of thousands of study subjects shows increased blood flow in women compared to men, highlighted in the red colored areas of the brain: the cingulate gyrus and precuneus. Men in this image have higher blood flow in blue colored areas — the cerebellum.
Credit: Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

The study findings of increased prefrontal cortex blood flow in women compared to men may explain why women tend to exhibit greater strengths in the areas of empathy, intuition, collaboration, self-control, and appropriate concern. The study also found increased blood flow in limbic areas of the brains of women, which may also partially explain why women are more vulnerable to anxiety, depression, insomnia, and eating disorders.

In the largest functional brain imaging study to date, the Amen Clinics (Newport Beach, CA) compared 46,034 brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging studies provided by nine clinics, quantifying differences between the brains of men and women. The study is published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Lead author, psychiatrist Daniel G. Amen, MD, founder of Amen Clinics, Inc., commented, “This is a very important study to help understand gender-based brain differences. The quantifiable differences we identified between men and women are important for understanding gender-based risk for brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Using functional neuroimaging tools, such as SPECT, are essential to developing precision medicine brain treatments in the future.”

The brains of women in the study were significantly more active in many more areas of the brain than men, especially in the prefrontal cortex, involved with focus and impulse control, and the limbic or emotional areas of the brain, involved with mood and anxiety. The visual and coordination centers of the brain were more active in men. SPECT can measure blood perfusion in the brain. Images acquired from subjects at rest or while performing various cognitive tasks will show different blood flow in specific brain regions.

Subjects included 119 healthy volunteers and 26,683 patients with a variety of psychiatric conditions such as brain trauma, bipolar disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia/psychotic disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A total of 128 brain regions were analyzed for subjects at baseline and while performing a concentration task.

Understanding these differences is important because brain disorders affect men and women differently. Women have significantly higher rates of Alzheimer’s disease, depression, which is itself is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, and anxiety disorders, while men have higher rates of (ADHD), conduct-related problems, and incarceration (by 1,400%).

Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dean of the College of Sciences at The University of Texas at San Antonio, Dr. George Perry said, “Precisely defining the physiological and structural basis of gender differences in brain function will illuminate Alzheimer’s disease and understanding our partners.”

Story Source: Materials provided by IOS Press. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Daniel G. Amen, Manuel Trujillo, David Keator, Derek V. Taylor, Kristen Willeumier, Somayeh Meysami, Cyrus A. Raji. Gender-Based Cerebral Perfusion Differences in 46,034 Functional Neuroimaging Scans. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 2017; 1 DOI: 10.3233/JAD-170432

Read this article on Science Daily: IOS Press. “Women have more active brains than men: Largest functional brain imaging study to date identifies specific brain differences between women and men, according to a new report in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 August 2017.


The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group strives to better the lives of all women with a holistic approach to women’s health. Call for an appointment today: (707) 579-1102. Visit our website: www.womensobgynmed.com#womenhearthealth

Positive pregnancy test? What’s next?

I might be pregnant, what’s next?

Experiencing early signs of pregnancy or testing positive on a home pregnancy test means it is time to consult with a physician.

Early signs that you might be pregnant include spotting, vaginal discharge, cramps, breast changes (sensitivity, soreness, and color changes), and missing your period. Of course, noting the last time you had sex without using contraception properly can also help indicate whether or not you might be pregnant. When these signs occur, most women opt to use a home pregnancy test before starting care with an OB/GYN MD or certified nurse midwife. Pregnancy tests are easy to use and readily available for purchase over the counter at drug stores.

What to do following a Positive Pregnancy Test

If you think you are experiencing any early signs of pregnancy or have tested positive on a home pregnancy test, it is important to consult a physician in order to establish care with a medical professional as early as possible. Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group offers pregnancy test visits by appointment. At your appointment, our providers will confirm the positive pregnancy with a urine pregnancy test in our office. Once we have confirmed the positive result, we will establish your care regimen and will help you plan your health maintenance throughout your pregnancy.

If your in-office pregnancy result comes back negative but you are still experiencing symptoms, we will help you schedule another appointment if needed in order to provide treatment and advice moving forward.

What to expect at your first visit:

  • A thorough physical exam and review of your medical history.
  • An ultrasound to confirm your due date (when to expect you will go into labor).
  • Blood work and standard cultures for Chlamydia and gonorrhea.
  • A pap smear, unless you’ve had one recently.
  • Arrangement to consult with a specialist (if certain risk factors are present).
  • A request to see your old medical records (if needed).

Our experienced team of physicians, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners deliver comprehensive, compassionate preconception, pregnancy, and post-partum care to our patients and their families in a comfortable environment close to home.

Breast Cancer Study Results: Put that glass of wine down and get jogging!

Breast Cancer Study indicates that drinking just one glass of wine or other alcoholic drink a day increases breast cancer riskBreast Cancer Study Revelations

Drinking just one glass of wine or other alcoholic drink a day increases breast cancer risk, finds a major new report by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF).The report also revealed, for the first time, that vigorous exercise such as running or fast bicycling decreases the risk of both pre- and post-menopausal breast cancers. Strong evidence confirmed an earlier finding that moderate exercise decreases the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer, the most common type of breast cancer.

“It can be confusing with single studies when the findings get swept back and forth,” said Anne McTiernan, MD, PhD, a lead author of the report and cancer prevention expert at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

“With this comprehensive and up-to-date report the evidence is clear: Having a physically active lifestyle, maintaining a healthy weight throughout life and limiting alcohol — these are all steps women can take to lower their risk.”

Brisk Walking, Alcohol and Breastfeeding

Diet, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Breast Cancer systematically collated and evaluated the scientific research worldwide on how diet, weight and exercise affect breast cancer risk in the first such review since 2010. The report analyzed 119 studies, including data on 12 million women and 260,000 cases of breast cancer.

The breast cancer study and report found strong evidence that drinking the equivalent of a small glass of wine or beer a day (about 10 grams alcohol content) increases pre-menopausal breast cancer risk by 5 percent and post-menopausal breast cancer risk by 9 percent. A standard drink is 14 grams of alcohol.

For vigorous exercise, pre-menopausal women who were the most active had a 17 percent lower risk and post-menopausal women had a 10 percent lower risk of developing breast cancer compared to those who were the least active. Total moderate activity, such as walking and gardening, linked to a 13 percent lower risk when comparing the most versus least active women.

In addition the report showed that:

  • Being overweight or obese increases the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer, the most common type of breast cancer.
  • Mothers who breastfeed are at lower risk for breast cancer.
  • Greater adult weight gain increases risk of post-menopausal breast cancer.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in US women with over 252,000 new cases estimated this year. AICR estimates that one in three breast cancer cases in the U.S. could be prevented if women did not drink alcohol, were physically active and stayed a healthy weight.

Emerging Findings: Dairy and Veggies

The breast cancer study report points to links between diet and breast cancer risk. There was some evidence — although limited — that non-starchy vegetables lowers risk for estrogen-receptor (ER) negative breast cancers, a less common but more challenging to treat type of tumor.

Limited evidence also links dairy, diets high in calcium and foods containing carotenoids to lowering risk of some breast cancers. Carrots, apricots, spinach and kale are all foods high in carotenoids, a group of phytonutrients studied for their health benefits.

These links are intriguing but more research is needed, says McTiernan. “The findings indicate that women may get some benefit from including more non-starchy vegetables with high variety, including foods that contain carotenoids,” she said. “That can also help avoid the common 1 to 2 pounds women are gaining every year, which is key for lowering cancer risk.”

Steps Women Can Take

Aside from these lifestyle risk factors, other established causes of breast cancer include being older, early menstrual period and having a family history of breast cancer.

While there are many factors that women cannot control, says Alice Bender, MS, RDN, AICR’s Head of Nutrition Programs, the good news from this report is that all women can take steps to lower their breast cancer risk.

“Wherever you are with physical activity, try to nudge it up a bit, either a little longer or a little harder. Make simple food shifts to boost protection — substitute veggies like carrots, bell peppers or green salad for chips and crackers and if you drink alcohol, stick to a single drink or less,” said Bender.

“There are no guarantees when it comes to cancer, but it’s empowering to know you can do something to lower your risk.”


The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group strives to better the lives of all women with a holistic approach to women’s health. Call for an appointment today: (707) 579-1102. Visit our website: www.womensobgynmed.com


Read this article on Science Daily: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170523084758.htm

Story Source: Materials provided by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Original written by Diane Mapes. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Diet that includes vegetable protein may protect against early menopause

Eating more vegetable protein may protect against early menopause: Study shows modest but significant lower risk in older women, linking diet menopause.Results of a new study from epidemiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggest that long-term diet that includes a high intake of vegetable protein from such foods as whole grains, soy and tofu, may protect women from early menopause and could prolong reproductive function. Diet menopause.

Consuming enriched pasta, dark bread and cold cereal were especially associated with lower risk, while they observed no similar relation to eating animal sources of protein.

“A better understanding of how dietary vegetable protein intake is associated with ovarian aging may identify ways for women to modify their risk of early onset menopause and associated health conditions,” write first author and then-graduate student Maegan Boutot, with her advisor, professor Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson. Details appear in the current early online edition of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Early menopause, the cessation of ovarian function before age 45, affects about 10 percent of women and is associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and early cognitive decline, the authors note. Few studies have evaluated how protein intake is associated with menopause timing, they add, and to their knowledge this is the first to look specifically at early menopause.

Boutot, Bertone-Johnson and colleagues in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at UMass Amherst, with others, evaluated the relationship between diet and risk of early menopause among members of the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHS2), an ongoing prospective study of 116,000 women aged 25-42 when they entered it in 1989.

Participants were asked to report how often they ate a single serving of 131 foods, beverages and supplements over the previous year, from “never or less than once a month” to “6+ per day.” They observed that women consuming approximately 6.5 percent of their daily calories as vegetable protein had a significant 16 percent lower risk of early menopause compared to women whose intake was approximately 4 percent of calories.

Diet Menopause

For a woman with a 2,000 calorie per day diet, the authors explain, this is equal to three to four servings of such foods as enriched pasta, breakfast cereal, tofu and nuts, or about 32.5 grams a day. They adjusted for age, smoking, body mass index and other possible confounding factors.

Boutot and Bertone-Johnson add, “Though relatively few women in our study consumed very high levels of vegetable protein and our power for analyses of more extreme intake levels was limited, women consuming 9 or more percent of their calories from vegetable protein had a hazard ratio of 0.41 (95 percent confidence interval = 0.19-0.88)” compared to those eating less than 4 percent.

Others on the study team were from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. The study was supported by a grant from NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

For the NHS2, follow-up questionnaires have assessed nurses’ lifestyle behaviors and medical conditions every two years. Nearly 90 percent have continued to participate in followup. Diet was assessed five times over the 20-year study, allowing the researchers to capture within-person variation in changes in food and nutrient intake over times, Boutot explains. Participants in the study contributed more than 1 million person-years of follow-up, during which 2,041 women experienced early menopause.

Boutot and Bertone-Johnson suggest that more prospective studies of their findings are warranted, including studies that compare soy-based and non-soy vegetable proteins.

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Note: Content may be edited for style and length. University of Massachusetts at Amherst. “Eating more vegetable protein may protect against early menopause: Study shows modest but significant lower risk.” Read this article on ScienceDaily:  ScienceDaily, 26 June 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170626093604.htm.


The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group strives to better the lives of all women with a holistic approach to women’s health. Call for an appointment today: (707) 579-1102. Visit our website: www.womensobgynmed.com

Menstrual cycle has no impact on how a woman’s brain functions

Levels of estrogen, progesterone and testosterone in one's system have no impact on the working memory, cognitive bias or ability to pay attention to two things at once.A new study published in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience is setting out to change the way we think about the menstrual cycle. While it’s often been assumed that anyone who’s menstruating isn’t working at top mental pitch, Professor Brigitte Leeners and her team of researchers have found evidence to suggest that that’s not the case. They examined three aspects of cognition across two menstrual cycles, and found that the levels of estrogen, progesterone and testosterone in your system have no impact on your working memory, cognitive bias or ability to pay attention to two things at once. While some hormones were associated with changes across one cycle in some of the women taking part, these effects didn’t repeat in the following cycle. Overall, none of the hormones the team studied had any replicable, consistent effect on study participants’ cognition.

Professor Leeners, team lead, said: “As a specialist in reproductive medicine and a psychotherapist, I deal with many women who have the impression that the menstrual cycle influences their well-being and cognitive performance.” Wondering if this anecdotal evidence could be scientifically proven — and questioning the methodology of many existing studies on the subject — the team set out to shed some light on this controversial topic.

The study published today uses a much larger sample than usual, and (unlike most similar studies) follows women across two consecutive menstrual cycles. The team, working from the Medical School Hannover and University Hospital Zürich, recruited 68 women to undergo detailed monitoring to investigate changes in three selected cognitive processes at different stages in the menstrual cycle. While analysis of the results from the first cycle suggested that cognitive bias and attention were affected, these results weren’t replicated in the second cycle. The team looked for differences in performance between individuals and changes in individuals’ performance over time, and found none.

Professor Leeners said, “The hormonal changes related to the menstrual cycle do not show any association with cognitive performance. Although there might be individual exceptions, women’s cognitive performance is in general not disturbed by hormonal changes occurring with the menstrual cycle.”

Professor Leeners cautions, however, that there’s more work to do. While this study represents a meaningful step forward, larger samples, bigger subsamples of women with hormone disorders, and further cognitive tests would provide a fuller picture of the way that the menstrual cycle affects the brain. In the meantime, Professor Leeners hopes her team’s work will start the long process of changing minds about menstruation.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Frontiers. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Brigitte Leeners, Tillmann H. C. Kruger, Kirsten Geraedts, Enrico Tronci, Toni Mancini, Fabian Ille, Marcel Egli, Susanna Röblitz, Lanja Saleh, Katharina Spanaus, Cordula Schippert, Yuangyuang Zhang, Michael P. Hengartner. Lack of Associations between Female Hormone Levels and Visuospatial Working Memory, Divided Attention and Cognitive Bias across Two Consecutive Menstrual Cycles. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 2017; 11 DOI: 10.3389/fnbeh.2017.00120

See this article on science daily:  Frontiers. “Menstruation doesn’t change how your brain works — period: Normonal changes during the menstrual cycle have no impact on aspects of cognition, study shows.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 July 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170704093610.htm.

How to always look good at the beach with Laser Hair Removal

With the arrival of summer Dr. Lela Emad of Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group discusses the advantages offered by laser hair removal.

With a heatwave bearing down on Northern California pushing temperatures to the maximum, many people are heading to the beach or hanging out at the pool. Being swimsuit ready is easy with laser hair removal.

The process of summer waxing and constantly shaving unwanted hair, then repeat – and repeat again can be a burdensome routine when all you want to do is get out, dive in and cool off. There is a way to be swimsuit ready all summer long with laser hair removal.  “Traditional methods for removing hair like shaving, tweezing and waxing can be very cumbersome and time consuming for women,” explains Dr. Lela Emad of Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group in Santa Rosa. “Laser hair reduction offers a safe and very effective medical procedure to permanently terminate hair growth from unwanted areas.”

What is Laser Hair Reduction?

Laser hair removal is actually a medical procedure that employs an intense, pulsating beam of light to remove unwanted hair. A focused laser beam passes through the skin to penetrate and essentially vaporize individual hair follicles. The intense heat of the laser damages the hair follicle without harming surrounding skin and tissue. This process acts to inhibit future hair growth and although it may not completely guarantee permanent hair removal, over the course of a few treatments, it can provide an extended hair-free period. Periodic follow-up maintenance treatments are recommended as well.

The procedure is extremely precise and takes only a few minutes to remove hair from small areas, such as the upper lip or chin, and about an hour to treat larger areas, such as the back or legs. Laser hair reduction may require up to five sessions for optimal outcomes, and when performed properly, the procedure successfully terminates hair growth from treated areas in the vast majority of (up to 90%) of women.

Does it work for everyone?

Although anyone can undergo laser hair removal, best results depend on a person’s hair color and skin type. For example, people who have light skin and dark hair have the best results overall due to how the laser beam targets the pigment (melanin) in the hair. Advances in technology over recent years have made laser hair removal an option even for people who have darker skin.

Laser hair removal isn’t always as effective for hair colors such as white, gray, blond or even red because it’s more difficult for the laser to target that range of color,” said Dr. Emad. “Although people with lighter color hair will see results, it may not be as obvious as those with darker hair color.”

While laser hair reduction is fast and easy for patients, it is still a medical procedure that requires an experienced technician to ensure it is performed safely and effectively. The physicians at Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group carry years of experience in performing laser hair reduction and they take care to attend to any discomfort or bad reactions patients may have to the procedure.

Best outcomes for laser hair removal

Laser hair removal leaves skin smooth and soft on the underarms, legs and arms, hands, back, face, bikini area. The results are always immediate and quite lasting. And since hair follicles are essentially transformed by laser light, hair typically will not grow back as quickly as prior to the treatment and occasional touch-ups are recommended to keep the skin smooth and hair-free.

“Patients who have experienced laser technology for hair removal tend to feel better about the look of their skin, and many report experiencing an improvement in body image that gives a boost of confidence,” says Dr. Email. “Above all else, patients appreciate the convenience it provides to the grooming routine.”

About Women’s OB/GYN Laser Hair Removal

Women’s OB/GYN physicians also offer expert advice and products for general skin care and treatment. Call (707) 579-1102 to schedule an appointment and for more information about laser hair reduction and skin care offered by the group. Visit the website to learn more.