Healthy Lifestyle Choices to Ensure a Lifetime of Breast Health

Healthy Lifestyle Choices to Ensure a Lifetime of Breast Health

In this article Dr. Shazah Khawaja MD  of the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group of Santa Rosa focuses on empowering women for Breast Cancer Awareness month by highlighting breast cancer prevention strategies.

We believe that when a woman understands the facts about breast cancer she becomes empowered to take the necessary steps towards prevention. Breast health.During October’s National Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign, The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group is focusing on empowerment through knowledge leading to healthy choices. “We believe that when a woman understands the facts about breast cancer she becomes empowered to take the necessary steps towards prevention. By working to detect the disease in its early stages, a woman is able to make lifestyle changes to reduce the odds of developing the disease in the first place,” explains Dr. Shazah Khawaja, MD, Obstetrician & Gynecologist.

Despite decades of pursing an all-out cure and national efforts aimed at education and prevention, breast cancer remains the most common cancer among women in the United States, second only to skin cancer. Today millions of women are surviving the disease, thanks in part to early detection, improvements in treatment and by enacting healthy lifestyle choices.

The First Step in Staying Healthy

Experts agree that the key to not only surviving a breast cancer diagnosis, but to thriving for years afterwards is early detection followed by early treatment. Routine breast exams and general awareness of how to maintain breast health are both important elements in staying healthy. Practitioners at the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group encourage routine screening including regular self-breast exams, breast checks during annual gynecologic exams, and screening mammography – all approaches that help to detect breast problems early-on.  “I routinely tell my patients that when we have the opportunity to catch and treat breast problems early, we have a better shot of ensuring the treatment will be successful,” says Dr. Khawaja.

Understanding Breast Cancer Risks for Better Outcomes

Although a having a higher risk for developing the disease may be frightening, it is also true that women who have one or more risk factors for developing breast cancer, never actually develop the disease. With increased awareness about the risk associated with certain factors – particularly those that revolve around lifestyle choices that can be changed – women of all risk levels can become empowered to make better choices.

Some risk factors such as age, genetics or race obviously cannot be changed. Other factors including environment, can also be difficult to modify. While some factors influence risk more than others, a person’s risk for developing breast cancer can change naturally due to aging and by making certain changes in habits and daily practices.

According to the American Cancer Society there are several factors that can affect a woman’s breast cancer risks including:

  • Having children after age 30 (shown to increase the risk of breast cancer in some cases).
  • Birth Control (oral and injectable contraceptives stand out in studies as contributors to breast cancer).
  • Alcohol consumption (the more consumed, the higher the risk).
  • Weight (women who carry extra pounds have a higher risk for developing breast cancer, primarily due to the higher insulin levels that accompany obesity).
  • Smoking (evidence suggests a link between smoking and breast cancer risk, particularly in premenopausal women).

Known Factors that Lower Risk:

Researchers continue to pursue the link between diet and breast cancer risk and many studies actually indicate that diet does play a role. More and more studies cast a wary eye towards red meat consumption, and there is an increased risk associated with high-fat diets, which perpetuates weight gain and obesity (a known breast cancer risk factor).

There may be sure way to prevent breast cancer as of yet, but there are things women can do to help lower the risk. A short list of actions includes;

  • Breast Feeding – for women who breast feed for 1.5 to 2 years studies suggest that there may be some benefit in reducing breast cancer risk
  • Physical Activity – a growing body of evidence indicates that a person’s risk of developing almost any cancer, particularly breast cancer is reduced by adopting a daily routine of physical activity. For example, as little as 1.25 hours of moderate physical activity per week may reduce the risk by up to 18 percent according to some studies.
  • Limit dose and duration of hormone therapy – Combination hormone therapy for more than five years is known to increase the risk of breast cancer. If you and your healthcare provider decide that the benefits of short-term hormone therapy outweigh the risks, use the lowest dose possible.

How OB/GYN Providers Can Help

Self-check breast exams are easy to perform in the home and should be conducted monthly in addition to annual breast exams with a physician at Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group. Depending on a patient’s age and individual health, we may recommend a more frequent interval of regular check-ups with a health care provider. And of course, if you suspect a breast health problem contact a provider immediately.

About the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group

Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group’s staff of physicians include; Lela Emad, MD, Shazah Khawaja, MD, Amita Kachru, MD, and Susan Logan, MD along with two new providers; Tara Bartlett, D.O and Melissa A. Seeker, M.D. Together, these doctors share a unique whole-body approach to medicine as they strive to find the underlying causes of a woman’s health problems, rather than simply treating the symptoms. The expanded team of health professionals including Certified Nurse-Midwifes and Nurse Practitioners is committed to both alleviating short-term ailments and maximizing long-term health. The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group strives to better the lives of all women with a holistic approach to women’s health. To learn more visit our website or to call for an appointment dial (707) 579-1102.

OB/GYN Offices Now Open

To all Women’s OB/GYN patients: Our offices are currently open at 500 Doyle Park Drive, Suite #103 in Santa Rosa.

Please note: Patients who go into labor are advised to go to Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital.

Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group Welcomes Elisabeth Niess, Certified Nurse Midwife

Elisabeth Niess, CNM Joins Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group

Midwife Elisabeth (Lisa) Niess Women's OB/GYN Medical Group

The newest addition to the OB/GYN Medical Groups team of midwives is Elisabeth (Lisa) Niess. She is a certified nurse midwife (CNM) with a Master of Science in Nursing.  Lisa received her nursing degree in Women’s Health from San Francisco University in 2012 and went on to complete her MSN in midwifery from Frontier Nursing University in 2017.

Lisa provides a full range of midwifery services to women and families of Sonoma County.  She is an advocate for women, encouraging shared decision making to empower women to be active participants in their own care.  She is also passionate about supporting women through the process of labor, birth, and the postpartum period.  As a lactation specialist, she loves providing counseling and resources to the nursing mother.

In her free time, Lisa enjoys spending time with her family, knitting, running, hiking, and baking.

About Certified Nurse-Midwives

Certified Nurse-Midwives (CNMs) are specially trained in providing healthcare to pregnant women from conception through labor and delivery. Many women opt to have a CNM serve as their primary healthcare providers during pregnancy. Maximizing the birth experience and the health of newborns and their mothers is our practice’s primary goal for pregnant patients. Achieving this goal requires expert knowledge about the gestation period and birthing process, as well as heightened empathy between providers and their patients.

Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group’s experienced CNMs offer expertise and tender care guidance to women during their childbearing years. Our CNMs understand that delivery preferences are extremely important and personal to expecting mothers, and that they can also be difficult for some women to determine. To ensure that our patients have the best possible experience during their pregnancies, our CNMs are especially attentive to pregnant mothers’ personal philosophies on giving birth and general reproductive health.

To schedule an appointment with Lisa Niess, please call: (707) 579-1102.

OB/GYN Midwives provide expertise and guidance during the childbearing years

Midwifery Services with Certified Nurse Midwives (CNMs)

Suzanne Saunders, CNM, Elisabeth Niess MSN, CNM, Cecelia Rondou, CNM, Kirsten Eckert CNM, WHNP

Suzanne Saunders, CNM, Elisabeth Niess MSN, CNM, Cecelia Rondou, CNM, Kirsten Eckert CNM, WHNP

Certified Nurse-Midwives (CNMs) are specially trained in providing healthcare to pregnant women from conception through labor and delivery. Many women opt to have a CNM serve as their primary healthcare providers during pregnancy. Maximizing the birth experience and the health of newborns and their mothers is our practice’s primary goal for pregnant patients. Achieving this goal requires expert knowledge about the gestation period and birthing process, as well as heightened empathy between providers and their patients.

Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group’s experienced CNMs offer expertise and tender care guidance to women during their childbearing years. Our CNMs understand that delivery preferences are extremely important and personal to expecting mothers, and that they can also be difficult for some women to determine. To ensure that our patients have the best possible experience during their pregnancies, our CNMs are especially attentive to pregnant mothers’ personal philosophies on giving birth and general reproductive health.

Our CNMs work in close collaboration with OB/GYN doctors, and serve as the primary health resource for pregnant women whom prefer to involve a midwife in their pregnancies. What to expect from your Certified Nurse-Midwife at Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group during your pregnancy:

  • Routine Gynecological Check-ups with attentive care to your physical and emotional health needs
  • Hospital delivery of your baby and special guidance during labor if desired
  • Supportive consultations with you and your partner
  • Constant communication with our OB/GYN physicians
  • Family planning and expert advice on the contraceptive use
  • Obstetrical Care
  • Educational discussions about breastfeeding, infant care, and what to expect during the postpartum period

The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group strives to better the lives of all women with a holistic approach to women’s health. Call for an appointment today: (707) 579-1102. Visit our website: www.womensobgynmed.com

The facts about licorice extracts for treating menopausal symptoms

Licorice roots have a flavorful history, having been used in ancient Egyptian teas and in traditional Chinese medicines, all the way to today as a flavoring agent and candy. And some women now take licorice extracts as supplements to treat menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that licorice could pose a health risk by interacting with medications.
Women take licorice extracts as supplements to treat menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that licorice could pose a health risk by interacting with medications.Licorice roots have a diverse and flavorful history, having been used in ancient Egyptian times as a tea and in traditional Chinese medicines, all the way to today as a flavoring agent and as an ingredient in some licorice candies. Some women now take licorice extracts as supplements to treat hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that the substance could pose a health risk by interacting with medications.

The researchers are presenting their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

“Concerns about the risk of stroke and breast cancer associated with conventional hormone therapy are prompting women to seek alternatives,” Richard B. van Breemen, Ph.D., says. “Some take botanical dietary supplements, such as licorice, to treat menopausal symptoms like hot flashes.”

But just because a substance is sold as a supplement in a health food store doesn’t mean it is completely safe for all people to take. And on its own, even as a candy, licorice can be harmful in some cases. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that licorice not be eaten in large amounts during one sitting, and warns that excessive consumption can lead to irregular heart rhythm and muscle fatigue.

“Consuming too much licorice can be harmful, but in our lab, we wondered whether the small amounts in dietary supplements might also cause problems by interfering with drug metabolism or transportation,” says van Breemen, who is at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “The liver has enzymes that process medications, and if these enzymes are induced or inhibited, the drugs will either be processed too quickly or too slowly, respectively.” He points out that these changes could pose a significant safety risk to those who take a daily licorice dietary supplement along with other medication.

Van Breemen’s team analyzed how three types of licorice — two North American species, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and G. inflata, and a European species called G. glabra — affected liver enzymes involved in drug metabolism. They found that all three species inhibit several of these enzymes. Only G. uralensis and G. inflataextracts were found to induce some of these enzymes. Therefore, the researchers say that G. uralensis and G. inflata are more likely to interfere with drug metabolism when compared to G. glabra.

Consumers would have a difficult time using this information, however, because most supplements don’t list the species on their labels. But the researchers are using this knowledge to develop their own licorice therapy that would be safe and effective for women experiencing menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes. They plan to start clinical trials on their G. glabra-based supplements next year.


Story Source:

Materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Read this article on Science Daily: American Chemical Society. “Licorice is a hot trend in hot flashes, but could interact with medications.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170821085705.htm.

Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group Physicians Recognized as Among “Top Doctors” of 2017 by Sonoma County Magazine

Santa Rosa physicians, Lela Emad, Shazah Khawaja, and Susan Logan of NCMA Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group have been chosen as among the top Obstetrics and Gynecology doctors by Sonoma Magazine’s Top Doctors survey.

Santa Rosa physicians, Lela Emad, Shazah Khawaja, and Susan Logan Top Doctors 2017

Amita Kachru, MD, Susan Logan MD, Lela Emad MD, Shazah Khawaja, MD

Sonoma Magazine’s Top Doctor 2017 survey polled Sonoma County doctors and medical specialists for healthcare practitioners they most often recommend to a loved one. More than 300 professionals are noted in the September issue as “the crème de la crème” in more than 50 categories. Among physician peers Dr. Lela Emad, Dr. Shazah Khawaja and Dr. Susan Logan ranked at the top for most likely to be referred in the category of OB/GYN specialists. “For the second year in a row, we are honored to be included among such an elite group of physicians in Sonoma County,” said Dr. Emad. “Our group is devoted to the work we do for women in this community, and it is nice to be recognized by our peers.”

About the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group

With a team made up of compassionate, expert doctors, midwives, nurses and medical assistants aimed at providing unmatched care to patients, the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group offers a full range of obstetrics and gynecology services to women in the North Bay region. “By putting our patients first, our goal has always been to meet the healthcare needs of women in a comfortable environment, close to home,” says Dr. Emad. “This is something we’ve been doing for more than 25 years.”

Services offered include:

  • general gynecological health screenings
  • state-of-the-art diagnostics
  • comprehensive pregnancy and postpartum care
  • full mid-wifery services
  • minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery
  • uro-gynecological procedures
  • incontinence care
  • menopause care
  • laser hair reduction, skin care and Botox Cosmetic

Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group’s staff of physicians include; Lela Emad, MD, Shazah Khawaja, MD, Amita Kachru, MD, and Susan Logan, MD along with two new providers; Tara Bartlett, D.O and Melissa A. Seeker, M.D. Together, these doctors share a unique whole-body approach to medicine as they strive to find the underlying causes of a woman’s health problems, rather than simply treating the symptoms. The team of health professionals including Certified Nurse-Midwifes and Nurse Practitioners is committed to both alleviating short-term ailments and maximizing long-term health. The practice partnered with Northern California Medical Associates (NCMA) in 2014 to strengthen its network of experienced healthcare providers, directly benefitting patient access to healthcare specialists in the area.

“The theme of our care is ‘women proudly serving women’,” explains Dr. Emad. “As women we understand the needs and expectations of our patients, and we strive to provide each patient with the best experience possible.”

The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group works to better the lives of all women with a holistic approach to women’s health. To learn more about these fine physicians and the many services provided by the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group visit the website. Call for an appointment at (707) 579-1102.

Annual mammograms at 40 prevents the most cancer deaths

 
When to initiate screening for breast cancer, how often to screen, and how long to screen are questions that continue to spark emotional debates.

 

When to initiate screening for breast cancer, how often to screen, and how long to screen are questions that continue to spark emotional debates.When to initiate screening for breast cancer, how often to screen, and how long to screen are questions that continue to spark emotional debates. A new study compares the number of deaths that might be prevented as a result of three of the most widely discussed recommendations for screening mammography. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may provide valuable guidance to women and their physicians about choosing a screening regimen.

To uncover insights that might help women make informed choices about mammography screening, researchers led by Elizabeth Kagan Arleo, MD, of Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, and R. Edward Hendrick, PhD, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, used computer modeling to estimate the possible effects of three schemes: annual screening starting at age 40 years, annual screening at ages 45 to 54 years and then biennial screening at ages 55 to 79 years, and biennial screening at ages 50 to 74 years.

The investigators estimated how many breast cancer deaths might be prevented with the different screening schemes. The team found that the recommendation of annual screening starting at age 40 would result in the greatest reduction in breast cancer-specific deaths: a nearly 40 percent reduction in deaths due to breast cancer, compared with 23 percent to 31 percent reductions with other recommendations.

“Our findings are important and novel because this is the first time the three most widely discussed recommendations for screening mammography have been compared head to head,” said Dr. Arleo. “Our research would be put to good use if, because of our findings, women chose to start annual screening mammography starting at age 40. Over the long term, this would be significant because fewer women would die from breast cancer.”

The researchers’ modeling also considered risks associated with screening, including callbacks for additional imaging and, in some cases, a needle biopsy, both of which may reveal the absence of breast cancer despite a suspicious mammography finding.

“Our results show the differences in the three current recommendations for screening mammography in terms of benefits and risks. Women and their physicians can use these findings to guide choices of when a woman begins screening mammography and how often she gets screened,” said Dr. Hendrick.

An estimated 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 63,410 new cases of non-invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the United States in 2017, with 40,610 US women expected to die from breast cancer in 2017. About 33 million screening mammography exams are performed each year.

In an accompanying editorial, Otis Brawley, MD, of the American Cancer Society, noted that it is ultimately an individual’s value judgment as to how many false positive mammograms and biopsies are too many to save one life. He stressed that it is important to acknowledge the limitations of mammography and to make it a priority to develop a better test. “The ideal test would be easy to administer and accurate in women of all ages, meaning there would be few false positives and few tumors would be missed,” he wrote.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Wiley. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Elizabeth Kagan Arleo, R. Edward Hendrick, Mark A. Helvie, Edward A. Sickles. Comparison of recommendations for screening mammography using CISNET models. Cancer, 2017; DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30842

View this article on ScienceDaily.com; “Comparison of screening recommendations indicates annual mammography: Starting at age 40 prevents the most cancer deaths.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 2017.

 

Dr. Tara Bartlett D.O. joins The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group

Dr. Tara Bartlett, DO joins the Women’s OB/GYN Medical GroupDr. Tara C. Bartlett, DO joins the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group to become the newest member of a team of healthcare professionals made up of compassionate, expert doctors, midwives, nurses and medical assistants, all aimed at providing unmatched care to patients. Dr. Tara C. Bartlett, D.O., is a practicing obstetrician and gynecologist.  She graduated from University of California, Los Angeles as a Phi Beta Kappa with High Honors.  She holds a B.S. degree in Biology with a minor in Global Studies.  Dr. Bartlett obtained her medical degree at Western University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine in California.  She completed her residency at Genesys Regional Medical Center in Grand Blanc, Michigan.

Dr. Bartlett holds numerous awards and certifications including Da Vinci robotic surgery certification.  She is trained in minimally invasive robotic and laparoscopic surgery, hysteroscopic surgery, myosure device, novasure endometrial ablation, nexplanon insertion, and intrauterine device placement.  She has participated in a number of research projects pertaining to her specialty including HPV genotyping research.

Dr.  Bartlett has a special interest in international medicine and was awarded the Rafi Younoszai International/Cross-Cultural Health Scholarship Award in 2013.  She has participated in medical outreach providing OB/GYN services for areas with minimal healthcare access in Peru, the Dominican Republic, and northern Spain.  “We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Bartlett as the newest physician to join our unique group of women healthcare providers,” says Dr. Lela Emad of the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group. “We are honored to have her in our practice. With this addition, both staff and patients gain a very talented and caring physician focused on providing quality support and unmatched healthcare to patients.”

About the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group

With a team made up of compassionate, expert doctors, midwives, nurses and medical assistants aimed at providing unmatched care to patients, the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group offers a full range of obstetrics and gynecology services to women in the North Bay region.  Services offered include;

  • General gynecological health screenings
  • State-of-the-art diagnostics
  • Comprehensive pregnancy and postpartum care
  • Full midwifery services
  • Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery
  • Uro-gynecological procedures
  • Incontinence care
  • Menopause care
  • Laser hair reduction, skin care and Botox Cosmetic

Along with Dr. Bartlett, the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group’s staff of physicians includes; Lela Emad, MD, Shazah Khawaja, MD, Amita Kachru, MD, and Susan Logan, MD. Together, these doctors share a unique whole-body approach to medicine as they strive to find the underlying causes of a woman’s health problems, rather than simply treating the symptoms. Every one of the health professionals at Women’s OB/GYN is committed to both alleviating short-term ailments and maximizing long-term health.

The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group strives to better the lives of all women with a holistic approach to women’s health. To learn more about these fine physicians and the many services provided by the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group visit the website. Call for an appointment at (707) 579-1102.

New Study Concludes: Women have more active brains than men

Largest functional brain imaging study to date identifies specific brain differences between women and men, according to a new report in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

 In the largest functional brain imaging study to date, researchers compared 46,034 brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging studies provided by nine clinics, quantifying differences between the brains of men and women.

The study findings explain why women tend to exhibit greater strengths in the areas of empathy, intuition, collaboration, self-control, and concern.
Side view of the brain summarizing blood flow results from tens of thousands of study subjects shows increased blood flow in women compared to men, highlighted in the red colored areas of the brain: the cingulate gyrus and precuneus. Men in this image have higher blood flow in blue colored areas — the cerebellum.
Credit: Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

The study findings of increased prefrontal cortex blood flow in women compared to men may explain why women tend to exhibit greater strengths in the areas of empathy, intuition, collaboration, self-control, and appropriate concern. The study also found increased blood flow in limbic areas of the brains of women, which may also partially explain why women are more vulnerable to anxiety, depression, insomnia, and eating disorders.

In the largest functional brain imaging study to date, the Amen Clinics (Newport Beach, CA) compared 46,034 brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging studies provided by nine clinics, quantifying differences between the brains of men and women. The study is published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Lead author, psychiatrist Daniel G. Amen, MD, founder of Amen Clinics, Inc., commented, “This is a very important study to help understand gender-based brain differences. The quantifiable differences we identified between men and women are important for understanding gender-based risk for brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Using functional neuroimaging tools, such as SPECT, are essential to developing precision medicine brain treatments in the future.”

The brains of women in the study were significantly more active in many more areas of the brain than men, especially in the prefrontal cortex, involved with focus and impulse control, and the limbic or emotional areas of the brain, involved with mood and anxiety. The visual and coordination centers of the brain were more active in men. SPECT can measure blood perfusion in the brain. Images acquired from subjects at rest or while performing various cognitive tasks will show different blood flow in specific brain regions.

Subjects included 119 healthy volunteers and 26,683 patients with a variety of psychiatric conditions such as brain trauma, bipolar disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia/psychotic disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A total of 128 brain regions were analyzed for subjects at baseline and while performing a concentration task.

Understanding these differences is important because brain disorders affect men and women differently. Women have significantly higher rates of Alzheimer’s disease, depression, which is itself is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, and anxiety disorders, while men have higher rates of (ADHD), conduct-related problems, and incarceration (by 1,400%).

Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dean of the College of Sciences at The University of Texas at San Antonio, Dr. George Perry said, “Precisely defining the physiological and structural basis of gender differences in brain function will illuminate Alzheimer’s disease and understanding our partners.”

Story Source: Materials provided by IOS Press. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Daniel G. Amen, Manuel Trujillo, David Keator, Derek V. Taylor, Kristen Willeumier, Somayeh Meysami, Cyrus A. Raji. Gender-Based Cerebral Perfusion Differences in 46,034 Functional Neuroimaging Scans. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 2017; 1 DOI: 10.3233/JAD-170432

Read this article on Science Daily: IOS Press. “Women have more active brains than men: Largest functional brain imaging study to date identifies specific brain differences between women and men, according to a new report in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 August 2017.


The Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group strives to better the lives of all women with a holistic approach to women’s health. Call for an appointment today: (707) 579-1102. Visit our website: www.womensobgynmed.com#womenhearthealth

Positive pregnancy test? What’s next?

I might be pregnant, what’s next?

Experiencing early signs of pregnancy or testing positive on a home pregnancy test means it is time to consult with a physician.

Early signs that you might be pregnant include spotting, vaginal discharge, cramps, breast changes (sensitivity, soreness, and color changes), and missing your period. Of course, noting the last time you had sex without using contraception properly can also help indicate whether or not you might be pregnant. When these signs occur, most women opt to use a home pregnancy test before starting care with an OB/GYN MD or certified nurse midwife. Pregnancy tests are easy to use and readily available for purchase over the counter at drug stores.

What to do following a Positive Pregnancy Test

If you think you are experiencing any early signs of pregnancy or have tested positive on a home pregnancy test, it is important to consult a physician in order to establish care with a medical professional as early as possible. Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group offers pregnancy test visits by appointment. At your appointment, our providers will confirm the positive pregnancy with a urine pregnancy test in our office. Once we have confirmed the positive result, we will establish your care regimen and will help you plan your health maintenance throughout your pregnancy.

If your in-office pregnancy result comes back negative but you are still experiencing symptoms, we will help you schedule another appointment if needed in order to provide treatment and advice moving forward.

What to expect at your first visit:

  • A thorough physical exam and review of your medical history.
  • An ultrasound to confirm your due date (when to expect you will go into labor).
  • Blood work and standard cultures for Chlamydia and gonorrhea.
  • A pap smear, unless you’ve had one recently.
  • Arrangement to consult with a specialist (if certain risk factors are present).
  • A request to see your old medical records (if needed).

Our experienced team of physicians, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners deliver comprehensive, compassionate preconception, pregnancy, and post-partum care to our patients and their families in a comfortable environment close to home.