Are women treated less aggressively for Cardiac Arrest?

Are women treated less aggressively for Cardiac Arrest?

Surviving Cardiac Arrest Could Depend On Your Gender

“Traditionally women have not been treated as aggressively as men,” said lead author Dr. Luke Kim, of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart suddenly stops working, according to the American Heart Association.

More than 300,000 cardiac arrests occur outside of hospitals in the U.S. each year, the researchers write in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Survival rates after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests have risen from about 6 percent in 2005 to about 8 percent in 2012. For the new study, the researchers reviewed data from 2003 to 2012 on nearly 1.44 million cardiac arrests. Some of the patients had been in the hospital when their heart stopped. Others had survived long enough after a cardiac arrest out in the community to be brought to a hospital.

About 45 percent of the patients were women, who tended to be older and sicker than the men. Over the course of the study, in-hospital deaths fell from about 69 percent to about 61 percent in women and from about 67 percent to about 57 percent in men. Read the full story here: